GENTRICITY


Gentricity presents a series of photo-essays focusing on urban change in a context of intense post-industrial regeneration. In recent years, cities have become sites of massive redevelopment where the synergies of culture and capital play an important role. The continued deindustrialization of cities, the rise of the service sector, the changes in labour and economic processes, and the gentrification of large urban regions are now receiving attention in cities all over the world, particularly in relation to the roles of culture and of the “creative class” in the urban process in general. 

Are these strategies improving living conditions in the cities, or, on the contrary, do they increase existing social inequalities? What is the current state of the “creative city” and how does it relate to trends like gentrification?

This project focuses on three cities that are paradigmatic of these changes: London, New York and Detroit. 

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The following photographs explore how a new Detroit is being “produced”, amid these narratives of urban regeneration. By focusing on the transformation process of the built environment, these photographs intend to show the social discourses and socioeconomic factors that shape urban space.

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The following project proposes a photographic exploration of urban change in London, through the context of regeneration. It is part of a larger body of work titled “Gentricity”, which aims to analyse urban change through current debates about regeneration, gentrification, and the links between culture and capital in urban renewal.

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The following photographs propose a journey through some paradigmatic regenerationareas in New York - Williamsburg and the High Line - and surrounding areas likeGowanus Canal in Brooklyn and the Lower East Side in Manhattan. They focus on the transformations ofthe urban landscape, showing sites of regeneration at an intermediate stage,exposing the layers of history and of symbolic value adhered to these placesthrough social actions. 

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